free log Vito Acconci and Steven Holl's façade and inner space of Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York transformed into a musical instrument by stringing up the inner space allowing visitors to configure the panels and play the building. Contact-microphones connected to software generate endless personalized compositions that are possible topographies of the building. <br><br>During the closing event several string instrumentalists and dancers played the space. The recordings were pressed into vinyl and played back into the space on which they improvised anew. A total of 9 tracks or layers were superimposed deconstructing the space into white noise.<br><br>Still Photography / image credits / Tomaz Capobianco
Vito Acconci and Steven Holl's façade and inner space of Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York transformed into a musical instrument by stringing up the inner space allowing visitors to configure the panels and play the building. Contact-microphones connected to software generate endless personalized compositions that are possible topographies of the building.
<br><br>During the closing event several string instrumentalists and dancers played the space. The recordings were pressed into vinyl and played back into the space on which they improvised anew. A total of 9 tracks or layers were superimposed deconstructing the space into white noise.<br><br>Still Photography / image credits / Tomaz Capobianco
Title: Vito Acconci and Steven Holl's façade and inner space of Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York transformed into a musical instrument by stringing up the inner space allowing visitors to configure the panels and play the building. Contact-microphones connected to software generate endless personalized compositions that are possible topographies of the building.

During the closing event several string instrumentalists and dancers played the space. The recordings were pressed into vinyl and played back into the space on which they improvised anew. A total of 9 tracks or layers were superimposed deconstructing the space into white noise.

Still Photography / image credits / Tomaz Capobianco